Fitness Recipe: Turkey Burger and Broccoli

There’s no place like home! True for working out, and also true for cooking! Staying consistent with your nutrition is crucial to sustainable results, and cooking with a fitness recipe makes it easy!

Bon Appetit!

Fitness Recipe: Turkey Burger and Broccoli

Ingredients:

  • Main:
  • 1lb Ground Turkey
  • 1 tsp red pepper flakes
  • 1 tbsp chopped garlic
  • 1 tbsp olive oil
  • Side:
  • 1 head of broccoli chopped
  • 1 tbsp olive oil
  • 1 tbsp chopped garlic
  • 1 tbsp paprika

Instructions:

  1. Preheat your oven to 400 degrees.
  2. Take a large nonstick frying pan and place on stove over medium heat.
  3. While allowing the oven to preheat and frying pan to get hot, combine turkey meat, red pepper flakes, and garlic in a bowl.
  4. Feel free to add any other spices you like!
  5. Take a meatball sized portion of the meat and form it into a patty.
  6. As soon as the frying pan is hot, coat with 1 tbsp olive oil and place your turkey burger patty on the pan.
  7. Cook for 3 minutes on each side.
  8. Once the oven is preheated, place your chopped broccoli onto a baking sheet.
  9. Cover broccoli in olive oil and garlic and top with paprika.
  10. Bake in oven for approximately 25-30 minutes and enjoy!

Fitness Recipe: Turkey Burger and Broccoli

This fitness recipe was originally published by Golden Home Fitness Coach Evan Aubrey and has been republished here with permission from the author.

Fitness Recipe: Salmon Filet with Mushroom and Green Beans

Fitness Recipe: Salmon Filet with Mushroom and Green Beans

If you’ve been to our site before (if not, welcome!), you know how powerful working out at home is, but what you do in the kitchen is just as powerful! Having a go-to fitness recipe (and ideally a whole bunch!), will help you reach the next level.

Bon Appetit!

Fitness Recipe: Salmon Filet with Mushroom and Green Beans

Ingredients:

  • Salmon Filet
  • White mushrooms (4/5) sliced
  • Pinch red pepper flakes
  • 1/2 tbsp minced garlic
  • 2 cups green beans cut in half
  • 1 tbsp olive oil

Instructions:

  1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees, cover a baking sheet in tin foil and place salmon filets on top.
  2. Once oven heated, place salmon inside and let cook for 10 minutes.
  3. Place cut green beans in a frying pan and add water until green beans are covered.
  4. Place over medium/high heat and let simmer for 20-25 minutes until tender.
  5. Strain green beans and water.
  6. Take the frying pan and add olive oil, garlic, and mushrooms.
  7. Cook until garlic is browned and mushrooms are tender.
  8. Add green beans back in and cook together for about 5 minutes and serve!

Fitness Recipe: Salmon Filet with Mushroom and Green Beans

This fitness recipe was originally published by Golden Home Fitness Coach Evan Aubrey and has been republished here with permission from the author.

Golden Home Fitness

Fitness Recipe: Stuffed Portobello Mushrooms

So you want to improve your health and fitness, right? While exercise in an incredibly important piece of the puzzle, nutrition is key too! Staying consistent is paramount, and using a quality fitness recipe like this at home helps you to stay on track.

Bon Appetit!

Fitness Recipe: Stuffed Portobello Mushrooms

Ingredients:

  • 2 tbsp coconut oil
  • 6 portobello mushroom caps, cleaned with gills removed
  • 1/2 onion diced
  • 1/2 lb ground turkey
  • 2 handfuls spinach leaves
  • 6-10 cherry tomatoes
  • Italian seasoning to taste

Instructions:

  1. In a skillet over medium heat, melt the coconut oil and place mushroom caps inside to cook until tender.
  2. About 5-7 minutes and flip halfway through to cook on both sides.
  3. Once cooked set aside in a plate.
  4. Next, add the onion to the skillet and saute until caramelized.
  5. Next, add the turkey meat and cook until no longer pink.
  6. Add seasonings and make sure to break up the meat to make it crumbly.
  7. Then add the spinach leaves until they wilt.
  8. Continue to stir the meat and onions to the spinach leaves will steam up quicker.
  9. Fill your mushroom caps with this turkey meat mixture.
  10. Feel free to drain any excess fat off before his step if you use a higher fat turkey.
  11. Then cut your cherry tomatoes in half and place on top of your stuffed mushroom and enjoy!

Fitness Recipe: Stuffed Portobello Mushrooms

This fitness recipe was originally published by Golden Home Fitness Coach Evan Aubrey and has been republished here with permission from the author.

Golden Home Fitness

Fitness Recipe: Chicken and Quinoa Burrito Bowl

Most of us have heard the saying, “abs are made in the kitchen,” but many often struggle with what to cook and how to cook it! We’re bringing you our fitness recipe of the week hot off the stove and straight to your kitchen!

Bon Appetit!

Fitness Recipe: Chicken and Quinoa Burrito Bowl

Ingredients:

  • 1 Tablespoon of chopped chipotle peppers in adobo sauce
  • 1 tbsp Olive Oil
  • ½ tsp Garlic Powder
  • ½ tsp Onion Powder
  • ½ tsp ground cumin
  • 2 Boneless chicken breasts – skinless
  • Pinch of Salt
  • 2 Cups cooked Quinoa (1 cup raw)
  • 2 Cups shredded lettuce
  • 1 Cup Pinto Beans or Black Beans (rinsed)
  • 1 Diced Avocado
  • Pico de Gallo or Salsa
  • Shredded Cheddar
  • Lime Wedges

Instructions:

  1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees F
  2. Heat a skillet under medium heat and add some olive oil. Once heated, add chicken and sear on each side.
  3. Cook the quinoa as instructed (usually 1 cup of Quinoa to 2 cups of water over medium heat for about 20 minutes until fluffy)
  4. Combine Chipotles with olive oil, garlic powder, onion powder, and cumin.
  5. Coat the seared chicken with the spices and chipotles and place chicken on a baking sheet.
  6. Place in the oven once heated and let cook all the way for about 25-30 minutes.
  7. Once the chicken is cooked, dice it up.
  8. Assemble your burrito bowls with ½ cup of quinoa, ½ cup of diced chicken, ½ cup of lettuce, ¼ cup of beans, ¼ avocado, 1 tablespoon pico de gallo, and 1 tbsp of cheese with a lime wedge and Enjoy!

Fitness Recipe: Chicken and Quinoa Burrito Bowl

This fitness recipe was originally published by Golden Home Fitness Coach Evan Aubrey and has been republished here with permission from the author.

Golden Home Fitness

Panel Discussion: Home is Where the Health is! (Podcast #19)

These days, it can be incredibly difficult to make the time to take care of our health! As a result, we’ve seen a proliferation of home-based services to cut out the commute and save time. Combined with the massive and growing need for improved fitness, the health and wellness industry is no exception! In this panel discussion, we’ve assembled five professionals innovating in each of their fields; all are focused on improving health outcomes by bringing high-quality products and services into the home.

Available most places podcasts are found, including:

Our Panelists:
Gordie Gronkowski – Gronk Fitness Products
Christine Alaimo – FarmersToYou
Johanna Gorton, LMT, Reiki II, CST – In-Home Massage and Wellness
Ray Zolman, DPT, CSCS – In-Home Physical Therapy
Bill Thorpe, MD, PhD – Golden Home Fitness
Moderator: Will Hansen, NSCA-CPT – Golden Home Fitness 

Timestamps:

  • 0:00 – Introductions
  • 4:05 – Why does bringing health and wellness into the home matter? 
  • 17:10 – How can we look at financial access to home wellness services? 
  • 26:10 – What does wellness, or being well, mean to you?
  • 32:00 – Where do you see the opportunities and challenges for in-home wellness in the future?
  • 40:30 – With everything coming to the home, how do we avoid isolation and bring people together more?
  • 43:30 – Audience question: How do you get yourself to change your health when it’s not your profession and health falls low on the priority list?
  • 53:00 – Outro

Connect with the Panelists:

Golden Home Fitness

Gronk Fitness Products

Farmers To You

The Roving Shieldmaiden – In-Home Wellness

Ray Zolman – In-Home Physical Therapy

Understanding the Low Carb Diet & Is it Worth it?

By Jocelin Boucher RDN, LDN. This article was originally published on DayByDayNutrition.org and has been republished here with permission from the author.

The low carb craze is here and has been a hot topic of debate for many years. In a way, this diet and many like it are ingrained in American culture. For this reason, I want to dedicate a little time to really dive into why a very low carbohydrate diet is considered a fad diet in the first place, why people practice and try them, and ultimately decide if this diet is something to try.

                First, making a decision to practice a certain diet should include education. It is important to know the research that has been done on short term and long term effects of practicing a certain diet so that you can trust outcomes from the food choices you make. You want to make sure it works and is safe; whether you are looking for weight loss, blood sugar control, blood pressure control, etc. A fad diet typically either leaves some science out of the full picture or lacks bigger picture and long term outcomes, making it unsustainable and not a lifestyle.

                The low carbohydrate fad diet has been around for generations. It has a lot of promise and creates quick results; however, there is a reason why low carb/no carb is considered a fad diet and not a realistic lifestyle. A fad low carb/no carb diet would be considered no fruit, no starchy vegetables (potato, corn, peas, legumes), no grains, no sugar, no wheat, etc. It eliminates foods that would turn into glucose in the blood after eating and digesting. The Keto and Atkins diets both follow these guidelines.

                When you eat carbohydrates, your body will use them for fuel and blood sugar regulation. Carbohydrates not used immediately do not get stored as fat, rather they are stored in the liver as glycogen. Conversely, dietary fat, protein, and alcohol do get stored as fat. The liver is a reserve that holds glycogen. When needed, the glycogen will get reverted back to glucose to keep blood sugar levels stable and feed your brain. This is evident when you are sleeping or not eating for long periods of time.

                A unique fact about glycogen and being stored in the liver is that it also carries water. On a very low carbohydrate diet, glycogen levels in the liver will be depleted. When this happens, excess water is also lost resulting in weight loss. People can lose 5-10 pounds of water weight in a week during this process. Doing this for a week or two is not going to cause harm for normal healthy adults as the body will adapt to not having carbohydrates to run on by burning fatty acids. The fatty acids will turn into ketones which is where the Keto diet gets its name. Your brain can run on ketones but it is not as efficient and you might feel less alert and a bit foggy. 

               If you are burning fatty acids instead of carbohydrates for energy, then that will lead to weight loss too, not just water loss, right? There is merit to this argument. However, if you are cutting out carbs, you are inherently eating a lot more fat and protein to feel satisfied (fiber makes you feel full and the only foods with fiber are:  fruit, vegetables, and whole grains – which low carb dieters do not eat). Fat is incredibly dense in calories. Calories are important to recognize here because calories are the foundation that drive weight loss (usually what low carb dieters look for as outcomes). Fat is nine Calories per gram where protein and carbohydrates are four calories per gram. This means that one tablespoon of olive oil is 120 calories and one tablespoon of rice cooked is 13 calories. This is a staggering difference. Knowing this, the water loss being driver of weight loss makes more sense since you probably are not cutting many calories. BUT, if you are under calories doing low carb, you probably are eating protein as your main energy source leading to risks of its own that we will discuss.

              Another effect of high fat and low carb is the risk of increased saturated fat intake. Animal meat is a dense source of saturated fat and you are more likely to eat more animal meat if eliminating most carbohydrates. Saturated fat is known to be correlated with heart disease and it is recommended that no more than 10% of total calories come from saturated fat (animal, dairy, coconut oil, palm oil). For reference, that is about 15 grams of saturated fat in a day where 1500 calories is the average intake. Traditionally, in the American food system (unless buying USDA organic) many animals are treated with high amounts of hormones and antibiotics, found primarily in the fat. By following a diet high in traditional American food system meat, you are exposing yourself to more of those substances. Research shows that long term exposure to these hormones and antibiotics can lead to antibiotic resistance and various cancers.

             Low carb diets inherently create a high fat and protein diet. Protein is not an optimal energy source and should only account for 20% of your total calorie intake or .8 grams per kg of body weight. Protein is primarily used for building blocks in the body to make tissue and other things. An additional danger with diets like Keto and Atkins have a lot to do with eating too much protein. If you eat more than you need, your kidneys have to process extra protein for energy or break it down to be stored as fat. Because kidneys are extremely fragile, eating too much protein over an extended period of time can damage the tubules that filter your blood, resulting in kidney failure. If both kidneys are failing, a transplant or dialysis will be required, which is something to be avoided.

             The truth is, in short term, a very low carbohydrate diet can help shed a few pounds quickly without harm if you’re a generally healthy adult. However, there are many more dangers in the long run and there are more sustainable ways to lose weight and maintain a healthy lifestyle. In a pinch, a low carb diet can be a good catalyst in changing eating habits to start going in the right direction. After all, it gives a fast result of weight loss (positive feedback) and it helps you cut out a lot of unhealthy foods. Some very carb heavy foods that are good to avoid are: cookies, cake, white pasta, white rice, white bread, candy, fruit juice, soda, chips, pretzels etc. because they do not provide any vitamins or minerals integral to a healthy metabolism and gene expression. They also lack the fiber that keeps you full and helps maintain blood sugar. When the body absorbs refined carbs such as a big bowl of white pasta or full glass of fruit juice, your blood sugar will spike and your body will store it as quickly as possible to regulate it. This can make you feel tired and irritable soon after eating, developing a craving for more carbs leading to overeating calories and resulting in weight gain. I call this the carb coaster.

             What’s the best solution? Work to limit or eliminate refined carbohydrates and replace them with complex carbohydrates full of important vitamins and minerals, keeping your body in optimal condition including weight loss. Complex carbs are: Beans, legumes, fruit, vegetables (yes all! Eat the skin of your potato for fiber and don’t load it with butter to keep calories down). Keep the denser carbs such as whole grains, whole wheat pasta/bread to smaller portions to prevent riding the carb coaster but still should be eaten for nutritional benefits. When working on weight loss, you want to only lose about 1-2 pounds per week with nutrition changes and exercise, otherwise it is not realistic and probably is water weight or muscle loss! Just remember, take it Day By Day!

Enjoyed this article? Check out how you can work with Jocelin as part of our comprehensive weight loss program, and get in touch with us to set up a complimentary no-obligation strategy session!